Ferguson

The uprising in Missouri is not about the militarization of the police, freedom of the press, the right to free speech, or the right to assemble: it’s about the oppression of Black people that lies at the core of American society.

To be sure, cops playing soldier in the streets of America is pretty scary. I think it’s received a lot of attention, though, because privileged segments of society see these images and think, “Oh, they could be coming for us next!” The implication being that the everyday violence against poor Black communities is all fun and games until it turns against white people.

Also, freedom of the press, the right to free speech, the right to assemble - commonsense democratic rights - are certainly fundamental to a constitutional democracy. But one point that’s too often overlooked is that, just because some asshole in a wig or whatever wrote them down on paper 200 years ago, doesn’t give them some magical power. Power is in the hands of the state, and it is exercised by the police. In this way, the police are already an arm of the military and have been for a long time, with or without body armor. Corollary to this is that, if the state sees fit to oppress some segment of the population - not just through military-style force, but through random searches, mass incarceration, etc. - democratic rights will make way for it.

And of course by “some segment of the population” here I mean Blacks. Why it’s this group and not some other, or not just the general population, is a complicated bit of history that begins with slavery. I mean, it’s really a pretty clear shot from slavery through Reconstruction to Jim Crow, the Civil Rights movement and the backlash against it, especially the prison boom and disparate drug laws and sentencing.

But I’m not very good at history, and the point I really want to assert is that this oppression is at the core of American history, society, and politics. Honestly, I’m not sure how to do that. I’m sure I’ve seen the argument made elsewhere, and I’ll look for it. So I apologize for the incompleteness of my argument, and for the lack of references. I’ll try to post some of the links to articles that have challenged me as a white liberal and made me reassess some of my politics. I’d be interested to hear others’ views and always send me stuff to read!

FUCK THE POLICE

liartownusa:

This. What to Say When You’ve Got Absolutely Nothing Intelligent to Add 

This. lol I’m so mad I was actually just about tweet almost the same joke.

liartownusa:

This. What to Say When You’ve Got Absolutely Nothing Intelligent to Add 

This. lol I’m so mad I was actually just about tweet almost the same joke.

liartownusa:

Oh Christ, It’s This Asshole Again

liartownusa:

Oh Christ, It’s This Asshole Again

"Differentiating is like squeezing toothpaste out of the tube. Integrating is like putting the toothpaste back into the tube."

— Calculus professor (via mathprofessorquotes)

medieval:

A dog eating its own vomit; a man and woman stand looking shocked.

Dogs haven’t changed much over the centuries.

14th C.  (via)

medieval:

A dog eating its own vomit; a man and woman stand looking shocked.

Dogs haven’t changed much over the centuries.

14th C.  (via)

A large mealy bug, Monophlebulus sp. walking.
Of the Family Margarodidae.

Video Monophlebulus by dnatheist (Alan Couch)
www.flickr.com/photos/couchy/6921182836
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed

­.en

Slow down there, mealy bud!

(Source: drhoz)

pourmecoffee:


Chinese farmer wears almost half a million bees


That’s too many bees.
liartownusa:

Uncle Nessie

liartownusa:

Uncle Nessie

watershedplus:

It is not unusual to find ice spheres accumulating along places like the Northeastern shore of Lake Michigan during cold winters. The balls tend to form where water turbulence breaks up a layer of slush. Mattes of slush and frazil ice accrete in the turbulent, supercooled water. Where the wave action is strongest, typically near-shore, slush and frazil evolve into spherical lumps. If conditions are just right, they’ll continue to grow until waves push them ashore.

From Earth Science Picture of the day
Photos by Leda Olmsted

I thought for sure “frazil ice" was a typo. It’s not. It’s awesome. If you’re into water and ice, this is the Earth for you (maybe time to get out of New Mexico though).

inacom:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 22971, f. 60v (Sri Lanka). Secrets de l’histoire naturelle. Cognac, c1480-1485. Artist: Robinet Testard. snail houses.


Snail houses are the ones I want.

inacom:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 22971, f. 60v (Sri Lanka). Secrets de l’histoire naturelle. Cognac, c1480-1485. Artist: Robinet Testard. snail houses.

Snail houses are the ones I want.

(via medieval)