pourmecoffee:


Chinese farmer wears almost half a million bees


That’s too many bees.
liartownusa:

Uncle Nessie

liartownusa:

Uncle Nessie

watershedplus:

It is not unusual to find ice spheres accumulating along places like the Northeastern shore of Lake Michigan during cold winters. The balls tend to form where water turbulence breaks up a layer of slush. Mattes of slush and frazil ice accrete in the turbulent, supercooled water. Where the wave action is strongest, typically near-shore, slush and frazil evolve into spherical lumps. If conditions are just right, they’ll continue to grow until waves push them ashore.

From Earth Science Picture of the day
Photos by Leda Olmsted

I thought for sure “frazil ice" was a typo. It’s not. It’s awesome. If you’re into water and ice, this is the Earth for you (maybe time to get out of New Mexico though).

inacom:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 22971, f. 60v (Sri Lanka). Secrets de l’histoire naturelle. Cognac, c1480-1485. Artist: Robinet Testard. snail houses.


Snail houses are the ones I want.

inacom:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 22971, f. 60v (Sri Lanka). Secrets de l’histoire naturelle. Cognac, c1480-1485. Artist: Robinet Testard. snail houses.

Snail houses are the ones I want.

(via medieval)

bexbax:

Medieval Lindorm Dragon, 15th century, from the alchemical scrolls of Sir George Ripley”Lindorms were most often encountered in churchyards, where they fed on human corpses, and would sometimes invade churches.”


Fuck yeah Lindorms

bexbax:

Medieval Lindorm Dragon, 15th century, from the alchemical scrolls of Sir George Ripley

Lindorms were most often encountered in churchyards, where they fed on human corpses, and would sometimes invade churches.”

Fuck yeah Lindorms

(via medieval)

cybergata:

Shironeko with hats

(via welldressedanimals)

In all of literature,
Only one thing is for sure:
Pantagruel was pretty cool,
But Gargantua was more substantua.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This high-speed footage shows how a dog drinks. The dog’s tongue curls backwards, creating a large area of surface contact with the water. When the dog pulls its tongue back up, water adheres to it and is drawn upward in a column. The dog then closes its mouth around the water before it falls. Fundamentally, this is the same mechanism as the one cats use. Part of the reason that dogs are messier drinkers, though, is that the backwards curl of their tongue picks up extra water. Because the dog has no cheeks, there’s no way to move this water from the underside to the top of the tongue and so the water just falls back out. (Video credit: Oxford Scientific Films; submitted by Carolyn W.)

Majestic.

medieval:

 Cerberus 14th c. MS Egerton 943, via British Library. 

I really like how put off that guy is by Cerberus nibbling his foot. He’s like, “Fine, if you must.”

medieval:

Cerberus

14th c. MS Egerton 943, via British Library.

I really like how put off that guy is by Cerberus nibbling his foot. He’s like, “Fine, if you must.”

(via pourmecoffee)

luminescentlabs:

Le Surréalisme 
The seahorse, Hippocampus erectus, divulging its covert biofluorescent coloration. 
A video showing L’hippocampe in The New York Times: “Fluorescence Is Widespread in Fish, Study Finds”
Photo: Drs. David Gruber, Vincent Pieribone and John Sparks

the peepers

luminescentlabs:

Le Surréalisme 

The seahorse, Hippocampus erectus, divulging its covert biofluorescent coloration. 

A video showing L’hippocampe in The New York Times: “Fluorescence Is Widespread in Fish, Study Finds”

Photo: Drs. David Gruber, Vincent Pieribone and John Sparks

the peepers